The Best Onboarding Practices For Employee Engagement

The late Australian businessman Richard Pratt (former CEO of packaging company Visy, amassed a fortune of nearly $ 5.5 billion) said that employee engagement is like a bacon omelet – adding chicken is a choice, but the pork is an absolute. How to get employees to contribute more bacon to the omelet (their work and

The late Australian businessman Richard Pratt (former CEO of packaging company Visy, amassed a fortune of nearly $ 5.5 billion) said that employee engagement is like a bacon omelet – adding chicken is a choice, but the pork is an absolute.

How to get employees to contribute more bacon to the omelet (their work and organization) is a question whose weight falls squarely on Human Resources and with good reason. In today’s article, we shall learn the best onboarding practices for employee engagement.

The well-being of employees is essential today. If they are not comfortable at work, it is difficult to promote their feeling of commitment, which can lead to unpleasant situations that affect, equally, the worker and the company. For this reason, companies are currently focused on creating the best workspaces and environments to attract and retain the best professionals.

Strengthening employee engagement takes time and requires important organizational culture changes. Here are five best onboarding practices that are being applied by companies inclined towards high levels of employee engagement.

1. Challenge Collaborators

People like difficult but achievable activities, although they do not necessarily agree 100% with their passion. This is the most difficult from a Human Resources point of view because being proactive and finding what challenges or enchants us about our work is a personal decision.

2. Foster A Sense Of Accomplishment

The Harvard Business School notes that a sense of progress or progress translates into the enjoyment of work and, ultimately, commitment. The reason? Simply completing a task gives us pleasure. The entity recommends establishing a policy of “small achievements,” especially when it comes to long-term projects, to leverage the satisfaction of the duty accomplished.

3. Offer Security And Confidence

Although nothing is guaranteed in life, the evidence indicates that the fear of losing a job negatively affects job quality and performance. The same goes for the old carrot-and-stick mentality to motivate people. We are not saying that we stop evaluating performance or do nothing about problem collaborators, but that organizations whose culture is based on fear and control as a means of ensuring productivity get the opposite.

4. Promote Autonomy

A study by the American Psychological Association, which surveyed 400,000 people in 63 countries, found that autonomy and control over one’s life are more important to happiness than money. In the context of work, this implies having a certain degree of freedom over our time and activities. It is for this reason that flexible companies (with respect to working hours) report higher levels of well-being compared to those that do not. How many organizations are ready, or rather willing, to give up the control that this implies?

5. Pay Attention To The Work Environment

Basing the organizational culture on respect, collaboration, and trust is prioritizing the quality of interpersonal relationships. Gallup research has found that people who have good friends at work are more productive and engaged.

Taking employees from participation to active commitment should be one of the main priorities of the Human Resources area, if not the most important.  The commitment of employees is defined as the degree of emotional and intellectual involvement of the employee with the company and the challenges of the business; therefore, it is directly related and will increase as employees find opportunities for growth and benefits that contribute to reconciling life, family, and work.

Tracking Performance Models

In the field of performance evaluation, trends make it evident that companies abandon the model where only the measurement of numerical data is important and move towards a model that achieves a real and significant impact, such as the ability to work in a team, set challenging goals on how to be better and innovate to add value from our company and jobs, to our environment, the lives of other people and the world.

In performance measurement, on the other hand, constructive feedback processes with SMART objectives are adopted, highlighting the strengths to create and be better. This process allows throughout the year that boss and collaborator can have valuable conversations, to implement employee training and reduce disengaged employees, and set priorities; and it is at this moment when the immediate boss becomes a leader and assumes the responsibility of guiding and orienting his professional teams in their professional development and in the achievement of goals.

In Conclusion

The new models allow the employee to empower himself in his career, set his own goals, and guide his professional career within the framework of the company, flexibility that increases his commitment to the organization.

Technology constantly generates changes that transform the way we live and requires that new models are also incorporated into the workplace, which provides flexibility for work teams to adapt their goals, innovate and respond more quickly to new trends and consumer needs.

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